National Parliamentary Secretariat

Location: Honiara, Solomon Islands
Client: National Parliament
Status: Due 2019

 

JCA were engaged to undertake the design and documentation of a proposed new Parliamentary Secretariat Building located on Hibiscus Avenue at the foot of Parliament House. The Parliamentary Secretariat provide a significant role within the Government of the Solomon Islands. Their function provides a conduit between Parliamentary activities and the public record servicing Ministers directly and ensuring governance and transparency in all Committee hearings. The building will look to consolidate the appointed Committee members, committee secretaries, Secretariat Directors and additional PA, security and research staff with the necessary Committee rooms which are currently located within Parliament House. This building will present a more cohesive structure allowing the Hearings to be better managed, controlled, recorded and organised. The key components of the new building will be the Committee rooms themselves, which will be developed to offer increased flexibility and as such increase their potential usage. In addition to the Committee rooms, the new Building will also incorporate a new Conference space for up to 350 people (seated). The proposed Location of the Parliamentary Secretariat is an important factor in determining the selection of materials appropriate to Honiara. Important practical considerations include suitability to tropical conditions, material availability, sustainability and value for money. Cultural considerations are also critical in enabling this building to be understood in context and relationship to established Solomon Island architecture.  The design expresses a raised village with a series of buildings (Leaf Huts) around a central open area. Achieved through the use of contemporary building systems and material selections that also reference a traditional architetcural heritage. Important practical considerations include suitability to tropical conditions, material availability, sustainability and value for money. Cultural considerations are also critical in enabling this building to be understood in context and relationship to established Solomon Island architecture.  The building has been designed as a contemporary tropical response that captures the buildings symbol of renewal and revitalization of the nation’s institutions. Combining both traditional materials and building works (timber, woven matting) and contemporary (Aramax roofing, glass) with opportunities such as shell concrete aggregate, breeze blocks and off-form concrete the design has sought to deliver a uniquely Solomon’s tropical building. One that reflects traditional forms and shapes but in a more subtle and sophisticated manner.